Flea removal – My Dogs Have Fleas http://mydogshavefleas.com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 21:21:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mydogshavefleas.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x115.png Flea removal – My Dogs Have Fleas http://mydogshavefleas.com/ 32 32 Washington wildlife agency revisits pause on deadly wolf removal following new attacks https://mydogshavefleas.com/washington-wildlife-agency-revisits-pause-on-deadly-wolf-removal-following-new-attacks/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 17:47:48 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/washington-wildlife-agency-revisits-pause-on-deadly-wolf-removal-following-new-attacks/ (The Center Square) – Less than two weeks after state wildlife managers suspended deadly wolf culling due to mistakes in a recent hunt, another pack has reached the limit of depredation to trigger an action. The Leadpoint Pack which claims territory in northern Stevens and Pend Oreille counties has killed three cows and calves and […]]]>

(The Center Square) – Less than two weeks after state wildlife managers suspended deadly wolf culling due to mistakes in a recent hunt, another pack has reached the limit of depredation to trigger an action.

The Leadpoint Pack which claims territory in northern Stevens and Pend Oreille counties has killed three cows and calves and injured two others since Aug. 22, according to a new report from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Staci Lehman, spokesperson for the agency, said the WDFW team is developing a recommendation on how to deal with the situation. She said that plan would be delivered to Director Kelly Susewind within a day or two.

“Then it just depends on how long it takes him to review and make a decision,” she said in an email to The Center Square on Wednesday.

WDFW’s wolf culling policy allows a hunt for pack members who kill or injure livestock three times in 30 days or four times in 10 months. The breeder must prove that non-lethal measures did not work before a wolf can be euthanized.

“How long will they think about it?” asks Scott Nielsen, president of the Stevens County Cattlemen’s Association and Washington Cattle Producers board member.

“The state’s wolf management plan was passed 10 years ago, and we’re still having trouble trying to get WDFW to follow their own guidelines on lethal culling. It’s time for a new process that works better to protect the interests of farmers trying to produce food.

Susewind suspended lethal takedown operations after a failed hunt for a pack member from Smackout on September 1. The pack had launched five attacks in 30 days on private and public lands in Stevens and Pend Oreille counties.

Seven days later, WDFW reported that a cub was mistakenly killed instead of an adult, and that the animal was likely a member of the Dirty Shirt Pack, which was also in the area.

Jeff Flood, wildlife conflict specialist for Stevens and Ferry counties, said the juvenile male killed in the WDFW hunt was black in color and there were no known black-furred wolves in the area. the Smackout Pack. He also said the pup was chased and killed in Dirty Shirt territory.

Nielsen said the question must be asked if WDFW’s failures in the latest hunt were intended to “sabotage” the lethal elimination program opposed by Governor Jay Inslee and many agency employees.

“You hate to think there’s some hidden motivation, but this is a professional agency, so mistakes of this level don’t really make sense,” he said. “There is a lot of political motivation not to solve this problem, so we have to ask ourselves what is happening here.”

Nielsen said the return of the Leadpoint Pack to kill and injure livestock is just the latest example of problems threatening the viability of small ranches.

He said WDFW wants to pay the lowest possible market prices for cows and calves that are killed or badly injured. While this is already a problem, the situation involving fair compensation is more complex, he said.

Although the market value of a cow might be $2,000 to $3,000, she would have been bred to produce more calves in the future, so the loss of income is actually much higher, a he declared.

Flood said the rancher also loses income when cows traumatized by an attack become sterile or miscarry. The entire herd may also lose weight due to stress, which lowers its market value.

If the herd has to be moved from public pastures for protection, Flood said the rancher often has to pay for hay to supplement the forage that might be found on their private pastures.

“There’s a lot more to this than the direct losses from the attack,” he said.

WDFW released a report on September 20 on the latest developments involving the Leadpoint Pack, with all attacks taking place in Stevens County.

On September 1, a rider in a private pasture reported a newly dead calf that had lacerations and punctures in the right groin and hindquarters. WDFW staff have confirmed the death of a wolf attributed to the Leadpoint pack.

Just over two weeks later, a dead cow is found by a rider in another private pasture. The cow had been killed less than 24 hours before it was found and the death was linked to Leadpoint’s activity in the area

The WDFW was called in to investigate two calf injuries at a private pasture in Stevens County on September 19. The animals had a combination of open puncture wounds, lacerations and hemorrhages consistent with wolf attacks. One calf’s injuries were estimated at 72 hours or less from the time of discovery, and the other at 24-48 hours.

According to WDFW, the concerned rancher had used two ranger jumpers provided by cattle producers. Efforts have been made to clear trees and brush on land in an area where wolves are known to cross, and other non-lethal deterrents have been deployed.

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North Naples construction site closed following removal of protected mangroves https://mydogshavefleas.com/north-naples-construction-site-closed-following-removal-of-protected-mangroves/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/north-naples-construction-site-closed-following-removal-of-protected-mangroves/ NORTH NAPLES, Fla. — A construction site just off US 41 has temporarily closed after environmental crime allegations. The South Florida Water Management District is actively investigating the construction site for the Perry Hotel Naples, just off US 41 in North Naples. SFWMD responded to a complaint from Collier County Waterkeeper regarding allegations that construction […]]]>

NORTH NAPLES, Fla. — A construction site just off US 41 has temporarily closed after environmental crime allegations.

The South Florida Water Management District is actively investigating the construction site for the Perry Hotel Naples, just off US 41 in North Naples. SFWMD responded to a complaint from Collier County Waterkeeper regarding allegations that construction had illegally removed and felled mangrove trees, a protected plant.

“South Florida Water Management District staff conducted a survey last week regarding the size of the mangroves at Bay House in Collier County. Staff found that construction had started without the standard, requiring a pre-construction meeting and a picketing and stringing inspection of the conservation easement line. As a result, construction was halted at the site. SFWMD staff will verify the line of the conservation easement and confirm that there are no unauthorized impacts to the wetlands before Project construction resumes. SFWMD staff will soon re-inspect the site to assess the condition and determine if corrective action is needed. While impacts on mangroves are generally regulated by the Department of Environmental Protection, SFWMD issues ERPs for development and land use that sometimes involve incidental impacts on mangroves. — Jason Schultz, public information manager for SFWMD.

What are the charges?

The Collier County Waterkeeper visited the site on September 15 following a tip.

“It seems that the mangroves have been destroyed or cut down, and not allowed. In fact, there are no permits…there is no permission to cut mangroves,” said KC Schulberg, the Collier County Water Warden – who is responsible for defending and protecting of all water-related conservation in Collier County.

The Walkerbilt Road property borders both Bay House and the Cocohatchee River – which contains thousands of mangrove trees along it.

Mangrove trees can be pruned in specific situations, but a permit is required, the Waterkeeper told ABC7.

“They had no right to cut down the mangroves on the permit. I saw the permit. We just have to see what happens,” Schulberg said.

What could happen?

If the hotel property is deemed by the South Florida Water Management District to be in violation of environmental code, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection would take over.

The repercussions could include fines, a stop work order, or even civil or criminal charges.

Why are mangroves so important?

Mangroves, although not an endangered plant, are a protected plant in the state of Florida due to their many contributions to our environment.

“Mangroves are an extremely important species here in Florida, if you think of all the mangroves do for us…they stabilize our coastline…they protect our habitat…they protect us from storms…they are habitat for birds, juvenile fish,” said Chad Evers, professor of ecology and water at Florida Gulf Coast University.

Evers tells ABC7 that plants are vital for wildlife habitats, as well as for preserving our state’s beaches, keeping our water clean and protecting the coast from hurricane damage.

“The root structure and the soil around it basically acts like a big sponge, so if we have a big storm surge, wind or wave action, what happens is that all the water hits the mangroves, and the mangroves will slow down the water, take in a lot of water, and take the energy out of the water and the wind,” Evers said.

Evers advises maintaining mangroves as much as possible. There should be no betrayal to remove them.

“In areas where you see the mangroves being removed, it usually leads to a lot of coastal erosion issues,” Evers said.

And after?

The general expectation is that the findings of the report from the South Florida Water Management District will be available by the end of the week.

It’s an ongoing story. Get more ABC7 as the latest details are released.

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Global Earwax Removal Market Outlook to 2030 – Featuring Medline, Henry Schein, Cardinal Health and Cipla, among others – ResearchAndMarkets.com https://mydogshavefleas.com/global-earwax-removal-market-outlook-to-2030-featuring-medline-henry-schein-cardinal-health-and-cipla-among-others-researchandmarkets-com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 14:20:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/global-earwax-removal-market-outlook-to-2030-featuring-medline-henry-schein-cardinal-health-and-cipla-among-others-researchandmarkets-com/ DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Earwax Removal Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report by Product Type, by Consumer Group, by Distribution Channel, by Region and Segment Forecast, 2022-2030” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The global earwax removal market size is expected to reach USD 3.7 billion by 2030 and is expected to grow at […]]]>

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Earwax Removal Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report by Product Type, by Consumer Group, by Distribution Channel, by Region and Segment Forecast, 2022-2030” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global earwax removal market size is expected to reach USD 3.7 billion by 2030 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.2% during the forecast period.

Companies cited

  • Medical line

  • Henry Schein, Inc.

  • Mckesson Medical-Surgical Inc.

  • Cardinal Health

  • Otex (Diomed Developments Ltd.)

  • Owens and Miner

  • Eosera Inc.

  • Innovative design work

  • Target Brands, Inc.

  • Debrox

  • cipla ltd.

  • Nulife Pharmaceuticals

  • Prestige Consumer Healthcare Inc.

  • Acu-Life Health Companies

  • Earest Inc.

  • GlaxoSmithKline plc.

Significant increase in the prevalence of earwax impaction along with growing awareness are the major factors contributing to the expansion of the earwax removal market. According to the report published by WHO in 2021, the average prevalence of earwax impaction is between 7% and 35% in different age groups. Also, with the increase in the geriatric population across the globe, the earwax removal market is expected to grow as impaction of earwax is very common in the geriatric population. Additionally, it is more prevalent in people using hearing aids and earplugs.

Rising infection rates and people facing problems like itchy and irritated ears have raised awareness about removing earwax. Adoption of correct methods for earwax removal and availability of various earwax removal tools and drops are positively impacting the growth of the market. Also, market players are introducing innovative products for effective and inexpensive decerumen. For example, Safkan Health introduced Otoset, an earwax removal device. This device looks like a headset and breaks down earwax using an irrigation method by delivering irrigation solution through disposable tips.

The micro-suction segment is estimated to dominate the market throughout the forecast period. Micro-aspiration is the most commonly adopted procedure for earwax removal and can provide immediate wax removal when an urgent clinical need arises. the adoption of micro-suction devices in ENT clinics has increased due to the advantage of the supra-auricular syringe. The main advantage is that it does not damage the mucous membrane, which can be a risk factor during ear syringing, and it is gentle on the ears. Also, the device is usually equipped with a camera that gives the audiologist a clear view of the inner parts of the ear and the amount of earwax.

Consumer-based, the geriatric segment is witnessing a lucrative growth owing to the growing number of geriatric populations. According to data released by the United Nations in 2020, the global geriatric population is expected to surpass 1.5 billion by 2050. Hearing loss is prevalent among older people and as a result, they are the top consumers of hearing aids, which increases the risk of earwax impaction. This is expected to have a positive impact on the growth of the market.

Based on distribution channels, retail pharmacies dominated the market owing to the growing number and expansion of retail pharmacies. Additionally, increasing adoption of automation and digitalization is positively impacting the growth of the segment. For example, in May 2018, McKesson Co. entered into an agreement with Discount Drug Mart, to provide dispensing automation platforms that will help optimize prescription processing.

Earwax Removal Market Report Highlights

  • The global earwax removal market size is expected to be valued at USD 3.7 billion by 2030, owing to the increasing prevalence of earwax impaction.

  • The micro-suction device segment dominated the global earwax removal market in 2021, owing to the growing adoption and benefits offered by the device.

  • The geriatric segment dominated the market in 2021 owing to the increase in the geriatric population and the growing use of hearing aids by them.

  • Retail pharmacies held the largest market in 2021 due to expansion and adoption of digitalization.

  • Asia-Pacific dominated the market in 2021 owing to the growing awareness of earwax impaction and the presence of local players in the region. Moreover, the initiative taken by the government has a positive impact on the growth of the market.

Main topics covered:

Chapter 1. Methodology and scope

Chapter 2. Executive Summary

2.1. Market Outlook

2.2. Sector outlook

2.3. Competitive Perspectives

Chapter 3. Global Earwax Removal Market Variables, Trends and Scope

3.1. Mapping of penetration and growth prospects

3.2. Global Earwax Removal Market Dynamics

3.2.1. Market Driver Analysis

3.2.2. Market Restriction Analysis

3.2.3. Industry Challenges

3.3.Global Earwax Removal Industry Analysis – Porter’s Five Forces

3.4.Global Analysis of Earwax Removal Industry – PEST

3.5. Analysis of major transactions and strategic alliances

3.6. Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the earwax removal market

Chapter 4. Global Earwax Removal Market: Revenue Estimates and Trends Analysis 2016-2030

Chapter 5. Earwax Removal Market: Consumer Group Estimates and Trend Analysis 2016-2030, (Revenue)

Chapter 6. Global Earwax Removal Market: Distribution Channel Estimates and Trend Analysis 2016-2030, (Revenue)

Chapter 7. Regional Estimates and Trend Analysis, by Segments, 2016-2030, (Revenue, Million USD)

Chapter 8. Competitive Analysis

8.1. Recent Developments and Impact Analysis, by Key Market Players, 2016 – 2022

8.2. Company/Competitor Categorization (Key Innovators, Market Leaders, Emerging Players)

8.3. Supplier Landscape

8.3.1. Company Market Share Analysis, 2021

8.3.2. Analysis of the company’s position in the market

Chapter 9. Competitive Landscape

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/w778iu

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Trail Closure, More Tree Cutting Planned at Omaha’s Zorinsky Lake | Local News https://mydogshavefleas.com/trail-closure-more-tree-cutting-planned-at-omahas-zorinsky-lake-local-news/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:23:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/trail-closure-more-tree-cutting-planned-at-omahas-zorinsky-lake-local-news/ A preview of this month’s events in the Omaha Metro. A major trail closure and another round of tree felling are planned at Zorinsky Lake and the recreation area. From Monday until the end of October, people will not be able to go around the lake on weekdays because the 168th Street […]]]>

A preview of this month’s events in the Omaha Metro.



A major trail closure and another round of tree felling are planned at Zorinsky Lake and the recreation area.

From Monday until the end of October, people will not be able to go around the lake on weekdays because the 168th Street section will be closed.

The path around the lake forms an 8, with at 168 the link between the upper and lower sections.

The 168th Street section will be closed Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., according to the Omaha Parks Department. It will reopen daily at 4 p.m. and will be open on weekends.

The closure will allow Metropolitan Utilities District crews to work on utility lines as part of the South 168th Street Improvement Plan. The road is widened to four lanes and a new bridge will be built over the lake.

People also read…

Unrelated to the road works, a tree removal project is overseen by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Over the past two years, the Corps, in consultation with the city, has removed trees around the perimeter of the park.

The Corps announced this week that it has awarded a $479,740 contract to a company in Tekamah, Nebraska, for the next phase of work – tree removal along the park’s northern boundary.

Midwest Maritime Services will have until September 2023 to remove trees along the park boundary from 189th Avenue to approximately 167th Street.






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Some landowners and wildlife advocates have unsuccessfully fought the project, saying it dislodges wildlife and harms the aesthetics and tranquility of the park’s perimeter. Other landowners supported tree removal, saying the boundary was poorly maintained and problem trees were dropping branches or creating a hazard.

The Corps is removing trees and shrubs to enforce a 30-foot-wide clear corridor around the perimeter of the park. Primarily, the Corps says the corridor allows for a better understanding of the boundary between public and private ownership, reducing the chances that property owners in the area will build on or use park land.

The work at Zorinsky is the result of a nationwide push by the Corps after it discovered encroachment elsewhere on federal property it oversees. Around some federally owned reservoirs, homes and outbuildings have been built on federal property, according to Corps officials.

In Zorinsky, the problem involves fences, some retaining walls, birdbaths and flower gardens, said Kelsey Jolley, a natural resources specialist with the Corps.

A significant reason for encroachment at Zorinsky has been confusion over park boundaries, according to the Corps and neighbors. The perimeter fence that the government put in place decades ago is not actually on the border, but rather is located about 1-3 feet inside the park.

The lake and park are federally owned and the park is operated by the City of Omaha.

The Corps has completed tree removal along the southern perimeter of the park, Jolley said. Further deletions will be made in the years to come.

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Removing dams in towns like Ipswich is hard work but restoring ecology https://mydogshavefleas.com/removing-dams-in-towns-like-ipswich-is-hard-work-but-restoring-ecology/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 09:31:39 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/removing-dams-in-towns-like-ipswich-is-hard-work-but-restoring-ecology/ Dams can create beautiful waterfalls and ponds. Some produce hydroelectricity. In contrast, in Massachusetts dams are infrastructure that must be inspected and maintained. And the dams prevent fish from moving upstream to spawn, so the once-thriving herring fishery has dried up. Now there is a movement in Massachusetts, and across the country, to remove dams […]]]>
]]> Downtown becomes a regular target for bat removal https://mydogshavefleas.com/downtown-becomes-a-regular-target-for-bat-removal/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 05:54:47 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/downtown-becomes-a-regular-target-for-bat-removal/ This spring, on an ordinary night, Hollyhocks owner Gloria Herriott was sleeping soundly in her loft above her downtown store when she felt something hit her head. She lifted the covers to find a bat hanging from the ceiling fan. It was then that Herriott decided enough was enough. First, she tried a $100 bat […]]]>

This spring, on an ordinary night, Hollyhocks owner Gloria Herriott was sleeping soundly in her loft above her downtown store when she felt something hit her head. She lifted the covers to find a bat hanging from the ceiling fan.

It was then that Herriott decided enough was enough.

First, she tried a $100 bat sonar that emits high frequencies to deter bats, but it never worked. Then she hired a contractor to seal the holes in her apartment’s brick wall, some of which were no bigger than a penny. The same cannot be said for the cost of the work: $400.

Similarly, Becky Scott, owner of the building at 210 Fifth St. S. that houses J. Broussard’s restaurant on the first floor and apartments upstairs, said she paid more than $1,000 for remove bats that were nesting inside an old metal decorative piece. the top of the building.

“I think it had reached a point where I could feel it in our building,” Scott said.

Scott also said that at night she could see the bats flying out of the old Kwik Kopy print building next door before they also infested her building.

“There was a major bat problem,” Scott said. “I could watch them flying from the back of that building at night the whole time.”

Critter Capture, an Alabama-based wildlife and pest removal company, has removed bats from four downtown businesses in the past six months and approximately 12 residences in Columbus since it first began serving the region in 2010.

Besides the irritation associated with bats nesting in a building, the guano they leave behind is dangerous to humans when it produces fungi. The fungus can enter the lungs and cause histoplasmosis, a respiratory disease, according to a report on bat guano by the Environmental Protection Agency.

When services like Critter Capture arrive, workers have to find the entry point, sometimes smaller than a penny; then they put a net over it where the bats can escape but not come back. Once they’re gone, workers apply a sealant like putty or silicone to the holes, then clean the nesting area of ​​guano and bat residue.

Critter Capture office manager Lea Hartley told The Dispatch that the cost of bat removal varies greatly depending on the size of the bat colony inside the building and whether the company will have to clean up the guano left behind by the creatures.

“I mean, we’re working on a church now that’s going to cost $150,000,” Hartley said. “So depending on the size of the building, it can go very high.”

A bat sits on a windowsill in the former Commercial Dispatch newsroom. Bats have recently been flying into downtown businesses and homes. Grant McLaughlin/Dispatch Team

Critter Capture doesn’t actually capture bats, which means they could easily move to a nearby building. According to the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, three of the 15 species of bats native to Mississippi are federally protected, meaning it’s illegal to kill them.

Moving companies must also have a trapper’s license to operate in the state.

“That’s why pest control companies can’t come in and spray some kind of poison and kill all the bats in your attics; it’s illegal,” said Leslie Burger, associate professor of wildlife at Mississippi State University.

Burger noted that as land in the region continues to expand and land is cleared for construction, bats will use human habitation for shelter from falling temperatures and predators.

“It’s a safe place for them,” Burger said. “They are using our human dwellings and structures because there is not as much habitat for them as there once was.”

Local developer Chris Chain, who is developing the Old Stone Hotel on Fifth Street into an apartment/retail space, said he often deals with bats in his downtown buildings. He said he usually removes them himself. The one time he hired a wildlife removal company, it cost him over $6,000.

“It’s very expensive for just one of my attics,” Chain said. “I was bowled over by the price it cost.”

Still, he said bats are only part of the downtown landscape.

“It’s just the nature of a downtown building,” Chain said. “I mean they are everywhere.”

Quality and thorough journalism is essential to a healthy community. The Dispatch brings you the most comprehensive reporting and insightful commentary from the Golden Triangle, but we need your help to continue our efforts. Please consider subscribing to our website for only $2.30 per week to help support local journalism and our community.

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Does vodka kill weeds? Try this household trick to eliminate weeds https://mydogshavefleas.com/does-vodka-kill-weeds-try-this-household-trick-to-eliminate-weeds/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 13:00:55 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/does-vodka-kill-weeds-try-this-household-trick-to-eliminate-weeds/ When it comes to getting the perfect lawn, weeds often get in the way. As household tips and tricks become increasingly popular among gardeners who want to avoid chemicals and use what they already have, some wonder if vodka really kills weeds. When it comes to get rid of weedsa number of home hacks already […]]]>

When it comes to getting the perfect lawn, weeds often get in the way. As household tips and tricks become increasingly popular among gardeners who want to avoid chemicals and use what they already have, some wonder if vodka really kills weeds.

When it comes to get rid of weedsa number of home hacks already exist, from use salt to kill weeds at use cardboard for weed control. Using vodka to kill weeds is certainly available, and maybe a bit pricey. But does it work?

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Protesters gather in Back Bay, calling for the removal of the fence around the county park https://mydogshavefleas.com/protesters-gather-in-back-bay-calling-for-the-removal-of-the-fence-around-the-county-park/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 03:39:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/protesters-gather-in-back-bay-calling-for-the-removal-of-the-fence-around-the-county-park/ A small but vocal group of protesters gathered Thursday night in Newport Beach’s Back Bay, waving signs and calling for the removal of a fence surrounding county-owned land that was nearly sold to a political donor local last year — if it hadn’t been for the intervention of residents and Orange County Supervisor Katrina Foley. […]]]>

A small but vocal group of protesters gathered Thursday night in Newport Beach’s Back Bay, waving signs and calling for the removal of a fence surrounding county-owned land that was nearly sold to a political donor local last year — if it hadn’t been for the intervention of residents and Orange County Supervisor Katrina Foley.

The issue centers on the proposed 2021 sale of a 0.32 acre park parcel to Buck Johns, whose private property adjoins the parcel in Upper Newport Bay, for an estimated $13,000 . Although the deal ultimately did not go through, its process and consequences have come under intense scrutiny by a county grand jury and, more recently, the state Coastal Commission.

Although the land remains county property, a fence still stands around the plot, and in declining to remove the fence after Johns’ attorney sent a letter threatening legal action, county officials “relented inappropriately”. [the parcel] for private use,” according to the Orange County grand jury report released in June.

Protesters put up signs on a fence to demonstrate against the proposed and failed sale of property to a political donor in the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve.

(James Carbone)

Thursday’s protesters carried signs reading ‘Make our park public’ and ‘Take down the fence’ as they stood at the corner of Mesa and Upper Bay drives.

They were sometimes greeted by honks of support and bystanders on foot who took a sign and joined the protest just outside Johns’ home.

The group then marched to the fence at the back of Johns’ property, attaching signs to it with zip ties and evoking references to the Berlin Wall, with one shouting, “Mr. Gorbachev – I mean, Buck, tear down that fence!

In August, the state Coastal Commission sent a letter to county officials saying the fence is in violation of coastal law. In the letter, District Law Enforcement Officer Nicholas Tealer noted the grand jury report’s recommendations and said the state agency supports the removal of the fence and any other encroachments.

Tealer said the fence is considered a development “inconsistent with Coastal Law public access policies and a violation of Coastal Law and [local coastal plan’s] permit requirements.

Demonstrators march to the site of the fence to demonstrate against the proposed and failed sale.

Protesters march to the site of the fence to demonstrate against the proposed sale and failure of a property in the back bay of Newport Beach. County officials nearly sold the land for $13,000.

(James Carbone)

County spokeswoman Molly Nichelson declined to comment on the commission’s letter, and Johns’ attorney Patrick Muñoz did not respond to a request for comment by the press deadline.

In a prepared statement released by his office Aug. 23, Foley said the Coast Commission’s letter “confirms that public lands are to remain for public use – not private interests. In my first meeting of the Board of Supervisors in April 2021, the council considered a sale of public land for just $13,000. I immediately stopped the sale to review the details and legality. Afterwards, over 1,000 residents submitted signatures. objecting to the sale, and I removed the item.

“After the landlord sent a letter threatening legal action, the county refused to ask him to pull down his fence,” Foley continued. “I have always stood with the community in disagreement with this inaction, and I am glad the Coast Commission has finally weighed in to uphold the illegality of allowing it to be fenced off on public land.

“I look forward to the day when we see the fence removed and allow the community and wildlife to enjoy this beautiful land again.”

Demonstrators put up signs on a fence to demonstrate against the sale.

Protesters put up signs at a fence site to demonstrate against plans to sell a 0.32 acre plot on Thursday.

(James Carbone)

Dan Jamieson organized Thursday’s protest in coordination with Susan Skinner, with plans coming to fruition over the past week.

Skinner said this was the first in a series of protests planned if the county did not remove the fence.

“It’s a situation where the public is locked out of their property and they know it and they know it’s illegal to do it,” Skinner said. “The Coast Commission said pull it out…the grand jury said pull it out, and they’re not willing to do that.”

Demonstrators march to the site of the fence to demonstrate against the proposed sale.

Protesters march to the site of the fence to demonstrate against the proposed sale of the 0.32 acre property. It remains Orange County property, but has been fenced.

(James Carbone)

Skinner said she views the refusal to pull down the fence as political patronage.

Dan Cohen of Newport Beach said he was protesting Thursday night in place of his mother, Jean Beek, an activist who helped save Newport Bay.

“The Irvine Co. was ready to develop all of Back Bay. She and her friends worked to stop the trade and now you see the result. Here we are 50 years later fighting the same fight we fought 50 years ago, that public lands should remain in public hands,” Cohen said. “It’s strange, but here we are.”
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State and county both plan culvert removal to clear Purdy Creek fish lane – Gig Harbor Now https://mydogshavefleas.com/state-and-county-both-plan-culvert-removal-to-clear-purdy-creek-fish-lane-gig-harbor-now/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 22:06:59 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/state-and-county-both-plan-culvert-removal-to-clear-purdy-creek-fish-lane-gig-harbor-now/ Environmental Government The salmon don’t care about the culvert blocking them. All they want is to swim upstream to spawn. But Pierce County and the state, each responsible for multiple barriers on Purdy Creek, must work together to give the greatest number of fish the widest access to the 6.5-mile creek. State Department of Transportation […]]]>
Environmental Government

The salmon don’t care about the culvert blocking them. All they want is to swim upstream to spawn.

But Pierce County and the state, each responsible for multiple barriers on Purdy Creek, must work together to give the greatest number of fish the widest access to the 6.5-mile creek.

State Department of Transportation Contractors will embark on a year-long fishway project on the spur of Highway 302 in Purdy this month. Crews will replace an old concrete culvert with a 77-foot bridge where the creek passes under the highway and empties into Burley Lagoon.

Culvert taking Purdy Creek under Highway 302 Junction.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife says 33% of fish there are obstructed due to the shallow depth of the stream and high flow. (The the agency classifies the culverts 0%, 33%, 67% or 100% passable.)

“Most years, most adult salmon were able to cross that culvert,” depending on timing and rainfall, Pierce County spokeswoman Akiko Oda said.

Meanwhile, on a nearby secondary road…

Just 110 yards upstream, however, the Salmon faces a 320-foot-long system of county culverts that stretches beneath a Chevron gas station and 144th Street. This culvert blocks 67% of fish, according to Fish and Wildlife, also because of the fast-moving, shallow water.

Although squirting salmon such a short distance doesn’t seem like good planning or the best use of funds, the state and county intend to open the entire creek. It just won’t happen at the same time.

Purdy Creek

After the Highway 302 spur culvert replacement, all fish will be able to enter the open creek until they reach a network of county culverts below the Chevron gas station.

In May 2018, they completed a joint study lower barriers at Purdy Creek, said Kim Mueller, fishway delivery manager for the state Department of Transportation. The intent was for the state’s design to match the county’s solution even if the funding did not line up.

“WSDOT is committed to communicating our delivery plan as soon as possible to coordinate with other fish fence owners like cities and counties,” Mueller said in an email. “In the case of Purdy Creek, WSDOT coordinated our efforts with Pierce County throughout the development of the project.”

Departmental project still in the feasibility phase

Funding did not match. The state will soon begin replacing not one but three Purdy Creek obstructions. The department remains in the feasibility phase. In addition to the Highway 302 spur culvert, the state is replacing the 6-foot corrugated steel pipes under Highway 16 with 206-foot-long bridges.

Purdy Creek culvert under 144th Street.

According to the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, only 33% of fish make it through the 320-foot-long county culvert system that stretches under a Chevron gas station and 144th Street. These pipes are at the end of 144th Street.

Workers have begun preparing the site for westbound construction which will continue until next summer. Eastbound work will take place next summer through the summer of 2024. Fish and Wildlife reports that the eastbound culvert is 67% passable and the westbound is 33%. The combined cost of the three projects is $41.6 million.

“The State Route 302 and State Route 16 Purdy Creek culverts are a high priority for WSDOT because they improve access to a large amount of habitat (nearly 6 miles), they are geographically close, and the project is ready to ship with a design that is compatible with the county’s future barrier correction project,” Mueller said.

The 2018 study looked at different alternatives to restore full fish passage to the county’s Purdy culvert system. The researchers identified three main options for more detailed assessment.

They are:

  • Purchase and removal of gas station to restore an open creek and installation of a new culvert at 144th Street.
  • Creek diversion east of gas station with culverts at 144th and Purdy Lane.
  • Rerouting of the creek east of the service station, but closing Purdy Lane to traffic and blocking the north end to eliminate the Purdy Lane culvert.
Chevron gas station in Purdy

The purchase and removal of this service station and the exposure of Purdy Creek are among the alternatives considered in a study.

Purdy Lane is a side road parallel to the 302 Spur from the entrance of Peninsula High School to 144th Street. The stream runs between the two streets. Along Purdy Lane are a few small businesses, including SAVE Thrift Store and The Tax Shack.

Pierce County seeks grant funds

Pierce County last month submitted a federal grant application requesting funds to update the feasibility study to incorporate the state’s Highway 302 Spur project, Oda said.

The county is designing another replacement culvert from Purdy Creek to 160th Street, a dead-end road along the Kitsap County line that it co-owns with Kitsap, Oda said. A drop from the 4-foot concrete pipe outlet to the creek prevents 67% of fish from passing, according to Fish & Wildlife. The preliminary cost estimate for the project, including design and construction, is between $1.5 and $3 million.

The county cannot match state funding or its legal incentive. Its 2022-2023 biennial budget provides $6.6 million for fish passage efforts. That’s enough for one or two projects a year, Oda said. The money comes from state grants and surface water management funds.

Culvert from Purdy Creek to 160th Street

Pierce County is designing a replacement for this culvert under 160th Street on the Pierce-Kitsap County line.

The state’s 2022-23 budget provides $625 million for fish passage projects. The Move Ahead Washington transportation revenue package of nearly $17 billion over 16 years includes $2.4 billion to fund barrier removal.

The fact that state projects are currently under construction could increase the county’s grant opportunities.

“We partner with other barrier owners when our funding sources align, although there are opportunities for coordination even if funding sources do not align,” Mueller said. “For example, a fish barrier on a watercourse with recently corrected barriers will rank well with grant funds such as the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board. This helps to coordinate work in all watersheds despite the different barrier properties.

The court gave the state a deadline

Besides much more money, the state has a bigger incentive than the county. A 2013 federal court injunction forces him to expedite fish passage work in western Washington. It must restore access to 90% of blocked habitats by 2030.

The state has 3,976 railroad crossings over fish-rich waters. Of these, 2,083 are fish passage barriers, including 1,538 that block more than 200 meters of upstream habitat. To date, he has completed 379 fish passage barrier fixes, providing access to approximately 1,301 miles of potential habitat.

Purdy Creek where it enters Burley Lagoon

Purdy Creek empties into Burley Lagoon through a culvert not visible at top of photo.

The Department of Transportation completed 15 culvert projects in 2021, restoring access to 98.2 miles of potential upstream habitat. He plans to complete 14 more this year to add about 29.6 miles.

County assessment due soon

The county is evaluating which of its 750 culverts are blocking fish, an effort it plans to complete in 2023. A prioritization strategy and priority list should be developed within five years, Oda said.

To prioritize all of these potential replacement projects, the state and county look at habitat gain, fish stocks, partnership opportunities, existing culvert condition, downstream barriers, tribal contributions, project readiness, consolidation opportunities and public impacts. Purdy Creek provides habitat for chinook, chum and coho salmon as well as rainbow trout and cutthroat trout.

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Volunteers Wanted for Fence Removal Project September 24-25 | Rio Blanco Herald Times https://mydogshavefleas.com/volunteers-wanted-for-fence-removal-project-september-24-25-rio-blanco-herald-times/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 08:08:03 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/volunteers-wanted-for-fence-removal-project-september-24-25-rio-blanco-herald-times/ What better way to celebrate Public Lands Day than by removing barbed wire fencing on public lands to improve critical habitat for mule deer and elk? Backcountry Hunters and Anglers (BHA) has partnered with Colorado Parks and Wildlife to do just that in the northwest region of Colorado and needs volunteers. Take part in a […]]]>

What better way to celebrate Public Lands Day than by removing barbed wire fencing on public lands to improve critical habitat for mule deer and elk?

Backcountry Hunters and Anglers (BHA) has partnered with Colorado Parks and Wildlife to do just that in the northwest region of Colorado and needs volunteers. Take part in a weekend of stewardship, fishing on the White River and stories around a campfire in the Meeker area, home to two of the largest herds of elk and mule deer in Colorado.

What to expect

Volunteers will remove fence staples and wire ties using bolt cutters, wrap wire and remove T-posts. The bulk of the work will be done during the cooler parts of the day on Saturday and Sunday . In the afternoon and evening of Saturday, the day is open for fishing, hiking or relaxing at the camp, followed by dinner and a session around the campfire with good people. Even if you can’t stay overnight, help with moving either day is welcome and appreciated.

The area to be worked is in the Little Tom’s Draw area on BLM lands near White River. CPW Regional Director and Biologist Brian Holmes will speak in the evening about his work, the current status of local wildlife populations and the conservation history of the area.

BHA will provide lunch and dinner on Saturday and breakfast and lunch on Sunday.

What to bring

Leather gloves, safety glasses, and fencing tools (pliers, post pullers, etc.) if you have them. A bottle of water, sunscreen, insect repellent, and appropriate clothing for working outdoors and removing the fence (jeans, boots, long-sleeved shirt).

Meet at Rio Blanco Lake State Wildlife Area (about 25 minutes west of Meeker) and convoy/carpool to the job site. Community service credit for school or other organizations can be arranged.

For more information, contact Brittany Parker at parker@backcountryhunters.org or 863-885-1650.


PRESS RELEASE | Special for the Herald Times

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