Flea removal – My Dogs Have Fleas http://mydogshavefleas.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:15:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mydogshavefleas.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x115.png Flea removal – My Dogs Have Fleas http://mydogshavefleas.com/ 32 32 Plan to remove Middletown Highland Pond dam met with backlash https://mydogshavefleas.com/plan-to-remove-middletown-highland-pond-dam-met-with-backlash/ Wed, 18 May 2022 15:23:13 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/plan-to-remove-middletown-highland-pond-dam-met-with-backlash/ MIDDLETOWN – Dams are an important water supply and in some cases an energy supply, however they also limit the function of the river and damage surrounding ecosystems. The 12-foot dam was built in 1875 for irrigation, creating Highland Pond. The land had many different owners, but in 2002 the Audubon Society gave it to […]]]>

MIDDLETOWN – Dams are an important water supply and in some cases an energy supply, however they also limit the function of the river and damage surrounding ecosystems.

The 12-foot dam was built in 1875 for irrigation, creating Highland Pond. The land had many different owners, but in 2002 the Audubon Society gave it to the Middlesex Land Trust.

Since then, in accordance with its mission to preserve natural areas, the land trust has been responsible for the conservation and maintenance of the dam. However, over the years, the group realized that the dam was a financial burden and a liability.

According to land trust members, although there is money donated and set aside for the dam, much of it has been spent on constant inspections and monitoring, and it is not enough to maintain the dam, especially in an emergency. It is also unlimited, which means it can be used for other projects, such as improving the nature reserve more generally.

As a registered dam, the state requires a number of engineering studies to ensure it is up to standard. These studies revealed that the dam is classified as Class B, or Significant Hazard. If the structure were to give way, this would cause significant material damage downstream.

Stuart Winquist, chairman of the land trust, said one of the biggest concerns was the exposure and liability of the dam. “There are maintenance costs, but also, in the event of a breakdown, we would be liable for damages downstream. When we originally acquired the dam, people weren’t thinking that far ahead.

In June 2021, the land trust contracted Biohabitats conduct field studies and develop a potential plan for the removal and renovation of the dam. While liability and finances are a concern, land trust members stressed that it’s not all about cost. More importantly, they are dedicated to restoring the local ecosystem.

“There are two motivations for this. One is to eliminate a problem, which is the dam,” explained Steve Gephard, fisheries biologist and technical advisor to the project. “But the other is to do environmental and ecological restoration. What we have is a faulty man-made system that has a bunch of non-invasive invasive species… it’s about eliminating a problem and doing positive ecological restoration.

In order to move the project forward, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection must approve the land trust’s license application, which can take several months. He also needs to get a grant to further fund the removal of the dam.

Community reaction

Many neighbors, however, are unhappy with the proposed plan. Lisa Davis, who was enchanted by the pond long before she moved to the area, created a petition oppose its deletion. While she understands the environmental benefits, she noted the importance of the space to the local community.

“I was aware of the whole issue of the removal of the dams and I expected this kind of thing to happen, because I have seen many specials on this subject, and I am aware of the problems of fish that have to go upstream and issues with the overindustrialized northeast,” Davis said.

“I was just hoping that maybe our little pond and relatively small dam would get away from it all, and we could enjoy the beautiful scenery and expanse of water. Having an area of ​​open water is visually important for people and for certain types of wildlife,” Davis added.

Although a petition cannot prevent the move, neighbors can request a public hearing with DEEP after the permit application is filed. Davis hopes to do so.

Chris Brandt, who lives in the area, noted the pond was the main reason he and his wife moved to the neighborhood. As he explained, the pond has brought comfort to his family over the years, and he is very upset about it being altered.

“It affects me emotionally,” he said. “Every penny I have goes into [my home] to improve my children’s situation and give them a good life, and they want to take that point of view away from us. We skated on this pond, we fished on this pond, we canoed on this pond.

“It’s our happy place and they want to take it away from us and that’s not right. We bought this place because it was there. I understand it’s not our property, but that’s why we bought it,” Brandt added.

Concerns are “Miscommunication”

Gephard acknowledged the neighbors’ concerns, but stressed that he thought there was a misunderstanding about what exactly the project was going to do.

“People got used to it,” he said. “People who have lived there for a long time, the pond preceded them. It’s the status quo they’ve become accustomed to, and people are equating the current situation with nature. Much of what I’ve seen on the petition and other places they say “land trust destroys nature”. It’s not true. What the land trust does is conversion. It is a conversion of nature.

The group working on the project had two community presentations in April 2021 and April this year – to address concerns.

“We understand and that’s why we think community outreach presentations are so valuable,” said Sally Harold, the project manager who works for river restoration consultancy firm RiverWork. “People have a lot of myths that if a dam is removed there will be no flow, that the pond will somehow disappear. They will be faced with this basin which will forever be Or the dam is for flood control right now, and if we remove the dam, there will be more flooding.

Davis considers the pond a central feature of the Highlands Historic District and an important source of water in the event of a fire emergency. She still hopes to find ways to avoid removal.

“Biohabitats and the land trust painted a picture of the pond as very unhealthy, and if restored, it would be this clean creek and so on,” she said. “I certainly hope that if it passes, it will…but I think it won’t be as rosy as they paint it.”

In addition to speaking to DEEP representatives, she contacted the city council to see if the city would be potentially interested in acquiring the property and taking responsibility for the pond.

“I try not to be adversarial about it, I just want to see if there are any solutions,” she said.

For more information on the project, visit biohabitats.com.

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Illegal removal of dead wood from roadsides and stockpiles https://mydogshavefleas.com/illegal-removal-of-dead-wood-from-roadsides-and-stockpiles/ Tue, 17 May 2022 00:02:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/illegal-removal-of-dead-wood-from-roadsides-and-stockpiles/ Parkes Shire Council reminds residents that collecting fallen timber and harvesting timber on all public land, including roadsides, is an offense under the Local Government Act 1993 and punishable by law. a fine of up to $2,200. The council’s environment and sustainability co-ordinator, Michael Chambers, said: “As temperatures begin to drop and residents search for […]]]>

Parkes Shire Council reminds residents that collecting fallen timber and harvesting timber on all public land, including roadsides, is an offense under the Local Government Act 1993 and punishable by law. a fine of up to $2,200.

The council’s environment and sustainability co-ordinator, Michael Chambers, said: “As temperatures begin to drop and residents search for sources of heating, the council is calling on residents to help conserve biodiversity, by leaving dead wood along the roads and in situ reserves.

Each year, a small number of residents collect dead wood to use as a low-cost source of heating. Although this activity may seem harmless, standing dead trees and woody debris are vital components of healthy ecosystems.

“Unfortunately, some community members believe that dead trees are an indication of poor ecosystem health. Others mistakenly believe they are performing a public service by removing decaying wood from a site. In fact, deadwood is vital for maintaining forest productivity, stabilizing ecosystems, storing carbon, and providing food and habitat for countless species,” Chambers said.

The removal of dead wood has been recognized as a key driver of biodiversity loss in Australia. Standing dead trees contain tree cavities that provide nesting opportunities for insects, birds, reptiles and mammals. The removal of standing dead trees can be detrimental as it leads to habitat loss, increased predation by cats and foxes, ecosystem disruption and soil erosion.

Similarly, fallen coarse woody debris is an important resource for many organisms and ecosystem processes. Decaying wood can harbor a rich community of decomposers, such as bacteria, fungi and other detritivores, and is essential for maintaining nutrient cycles in forests and woodlands. Loss of woody debris can alter soil microclimate and indirectly impact forest food webs.

“By stripping an ecosystem of this natural resource, locals are doing an unnatural and unnecessary action that is undermining biodiversity across the County,” Chambers added.

The forests and woodlands of the western slopes and plateaus have been most affected by firewood collection as they contain popular firewood species. This region of Australia has been largely cleared for agricultural purposes, and the remaining forests and woodlands are further degraded by the removal of dead wood.

It is feared that this illegal activity could negatively impact several species found in Parkes County, including the swift parrot, superb parrot, glider squirrel, crimson rosella, rainbow lorikeet and kingfisher. sacred fisherman.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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Minecraft players are not happy with the removal of fireflies https://mydogshavefleas.com/minecraft-players-are-not-happy-with-the-removal-of-fireflies/ Sat, 14 May 2022 18:03:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/minecraft-players-are-not-happy-with-the-removal-of-fireflies/ Minecraft will no longer add fireflies in its next The Wild update. Developer Mojang explained in a recent Q&A that the decision was to ensure a more authentic experience regarding the game’s wildlife. Game. Minecraft’s upcoming The Wild update is set to expand and improve the game’s biomes. Part of this expansion is the addition […]]]>

Minecraft will no longer add fireflies in its next The Wild update. Developer Mojang explained in a recent Q&A that the decision was to ensure a more authentic experience regarding the game’s wildlife. Game.

Minecraft’s upcoming The Wild update is set to expand and improve the game’s biomes. Part of this expansion is the addition of new wildlife, including a few types of frogs and the glowing fireflies. which would serve as a source of food. However, earlier this week, Mojang announced that these fireflies will no longer be part of the update.

GAME VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: Pokemon Go’s Next Update Must Be For Casuals

In a video titled “Ask Mojang,” the Swedish developer answered some of the questions the Minecraft community has. In response to the question “What happened to the fireflies?” the developer gave a rather odd reason for the removal. Anna Lundgren, producer at Mojang, explained that some comments from the community alerted them to the fact that many species of fireflies and bugs are toxic to frogs.

So, to make sure the pixelated frogs aren’t poisoned, the fireflies were removed and a tiny, slimy food source was added. However, Mojang is keeping the concept of fireflies in mind for future updates and plans.

Safer Reddit, a thread regarding questions and answers and missing fireflies is filled with comments showing how upset players are about the change. Several gamers are shocked that Mojang is removing fireflies in a video game because their real-world counterparts can be dangerous. As one reviewer put it, this is a blocky game where slapping a cow with food can imbue it – clearly players aren’t concerned with the actual mechanics of the animals.


Meanwhile, others are unsure why fireflies have not been kept and are simply not used as a food source for frogs. After all, the concept of glowing bugs is already ready to be injected into the game.

Next: Tolkien Experts Saw A Glimpse Of The Rings Of Power – Here’s What They Think


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Removal of Burgess Shale fossils results in $20,000 fine for Quebecer https://mydogshavefleas.com/removal-of-burgess-shale-fossils-results-in-20000-fine-for-quebecer/ Fri, 13 May 2022 19:43:38 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/removal-of-burgess-shale-fossils-results-in-20000-fine-for-quebecer/ A Quebec man faces a $20,000 fine and house arrest after the discovery of 45 fossils from several national parks in British Columbia in his home. Parks Canada officials said the investigation was launched in 2020 after Lake Louise park rangers received a tip about the incident. A search warrant was then executed at a […]]]>

A Quebec man faces a $20,000 fine and house arrest after the discovery of 45 fossils from several national parks in British Columbia in his home.

Parks Canada officials said the investigation was launched in 2020 after Lake Louise park rangers received a tip about the incident.

A search warrant was then executed at a private residence in Montreal by La Mauricie National Park and Quebec Waterways rangers as well as Longueuil police on November 20, 2020.

The search recovered the 45 fossils, which officials say came mostly from an area of ​​the Burgess Shale in Kootenay National Park that is not accessible to the public.

Parks Canada officials said an expert from the Royal Ontario Museum identified the fossils as coming from sites in Kootenay, Yoho and Jasper national parks.

The man now faces a $20,000 fine and a five-month suspended sentence that includes a curfew order.

“This is the largest fine to date for the removal of fossils from the Burgess Shale and demonstrates the seriousness of the offense and the importance of this site,” Parks Canada officials said.

“Money from the fine will go to the Environmental Damages Fund and will be used to support projects that restore nature and conserve wildlife and habitats.”

According to the Canada National Parks Act, the removal of fossils, plants or animals from a national park is illegal.

The majority of fossils found in the various shale deposits of British Columbia date back to the Middle Cambrian period, approximately 512 to 520 million years ago.

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AEP ensures proper vegetation removal along Smith Mountain Lake and Leesville Lake https://mydogshavefleas.com/aep-ensures-proper-vegetation-removal-along-smith-mountain-lake-and-leesville-lake/ Thu, 12 May 2022 16:37:24 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/aep-ensures-proper-vegetation-removal-along-smith-mountain-lake-and-leesville-lake/ BEDFORD COUNTY, Va. (WFXR) – Appalachian Power is educating residents along Smith Mountain Lake and Lake Leesville on proper tips for clearing vegetation along the shorelines. “Appalachian Power is responsible for managing more than 600 miles of shoreline at the Smith Mountain Project to keep the lakes healthy and clean,” said Neil Holthouser of the […]]]>

BEDFORD COUNTY, Va. (WFXR) – Appalachian Power is educating residents along Smith Mountain Lake and Lake Leesville on proper tips for clearing vegetation along the shorelines.

“Appalachian Power is responsible for managing more than 600 miles of shoreline at the Smith Mountain Project to keep the lakes healthy and clean,” said Neil Holthouser of the Appalachian Shoreline Management Group. “But we don’t do it alone, we rely on the owners of the lakes to do their part in maintaining their shores. As more and more lakefront properties are developed over time, we want to ensure property owners understand the value of shoreline vegetation and are aware of the permitting process for vegetation removal. .

The power company says vegetation is important to help “filter runoff, protect against erosion, maintain lake water quality, and provide habitat for wildlife.”

However, residents will need an Appalachian Vegetation Removal Permit – which allows residents to remove vegetation that is 1/2 inch or larger. The permit allows residents to remove vegetation for the following reasons:

  • Provide a reasonable view of the water
  • Build access paths to shore and/or wharf or jetty
  • Construct erosion control measures along the shoreline
  • General maintenance of the vegetated area.

AEP states that if there are dead or dying trees, contact them immediately. They will then work with residents on ways to eliminate the threat.

“It’s best to keep mature, healthy native vegetation where possible,” Holthouser said. “Where existing vegetation is removed, replacement vegetation is often required to maintain buffer zone function. We encourage landowners to contact us early in their planning process so that we can work with them to achieve a balanced landscaping.

If you have a question about vegetation removal or the permit application process, call 540-985-2579 or you can email Shoreline Management here.

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Royal River Dam removal plans move forward https://mydogshavefleas.com/royal-river-dam-removal-plans-move-forward/ Tue, 10 May 2022 18:45:03 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/royal-river-dam-removal-plans-move-forward/ The Royal River Alliance is holding World Fish Migration Day on May 21 in Yarmouth to draw attention to the health of the river and how removing two dams could benefit the local fish population. Rachel Vitello / The Forecaster The Army Corps of Engineers will conduct a final assessment of the Royal River in […]]]>

The Royal River Alliance is holding World Fish Migration Day on May 21 in Yarmouth to draw attention to the health of the river and how removing two dams could benefit the local fish population. Rachel Vitello / The Forecaster

The Army Corps of Engineers will conduct a final assessment of the Royal River in Yarmouth this summer and submit a report to the city in early fall on the viability and cost of removing two dams.

The dams at Bridge Street and Elm Street, which are owned by the town of Yarmouth, have impacted the migratory pattern of alewife, a type of herring that lobsters feed on, according to Art Bell of the Royal River Alliance. A lack of feeder fish in Casco Bay, into which the Royal River empties, has caused many local lobsters to use pogies, another type of herring, Bell said.

The alliance will hold a World Fish Migration Day event on May 21 at the Royal River Park to draw attention to the problem and the need to remove the dam.

“We’re going to (bring back the alewife) by removing the dams,” Bell said. “It’s called the fish pass; let the fish be able to swim.

Restoring the gaspereau population would also restore the natural cycle of the river. Fish scavenge nutrients as they migrate upstream to spawn and die, which also creates a food source for other wildlife, according to Yarmouth Councilor David Craig.

Craig said removing dams is much less expensive than building ladders to allow fish to navigate around them.

“The city’s share will be minimal, we hope. There is a cost-sharing element, where the federal government can pick up most, if not all of the costs,” he said.

The federal match would be 75% and the local share would be 25%, according to Craig.

“Technical fish ladders cost millions of dollars, while dam removals are in the hundreds of thousands,” he said. “It’s important that people recognize that.”

The city has already spent about $70,000 of its share of the cost share during the planning stages, according to Craig. The Army Corps of Engineers conducted an assessment of the dams in 2020 and deemed the project “eligible for funding.”

The Royal River has been dammed since the 1700s, with the structures supplying electricity and water to a number of sawmills and paper mills, fish and poultry processing plants, potteries and tanneries which do not no longer exist. City officials have struggled for years to maintain the Bridge and Elm Street Dams that effectively turn 5 miles of the river into a narrow lake.

The Royal River Alliance advocacy group is reaching out to educate the public on the benefits of removing the two man-made barriers.

Bell helped start the alliance about 10 years ago after seeing on a fishing trip that the river was more like a pond, with a lack of fish and movement.

“We are trying to draw attention to the fact that the river is not healthy and that there is a reason why it is not healthy. We believe we can fix that,” Bell said.

The alliance hopes its World Fish Migration Day event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 21 at the park will draw attention to the issue, with a food truck, face painting, scavenger hunt for children, guided river walks, live music and educational speakers.

The bi-annual global event raises awareness of deteriorating river health and its negative impact on fish migration. This will be the first time the event has been held in Yarmouth since the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Alliance and World Fish Migration Day, go to royalriveralliance.org.

“It’s very family-oriented. Everyone will have something to do,” Bell said. “It’s also about education and advocacy; we are trying to send here the message that we want to act.

“What most people say is, ‘The river is fine with me. Why are you trying to fix something that isn’t broken? But the reality is that it’s a big deal,” he said. “That’s what we’re trying to convince people of and I think we have a program here that’s going to do a good job of that.”

” Previous

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Not much has changed at SGNP 25 years after HC ordered encroachment removed https://mydogshavefleas.com/not-much-has-changed-at-sgnp-25-years-after-hc-ordered-encroachment-removed/ Sat, 07 May 2022 01:54:25 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/not-much-has-changed-at-sgnp-25-years-after-hc-ordered-encroachment-removed/ This Saturday, the Bombay High Court’s order to clear Sanjay Gandhi’s national park of encroachment will run out for 25 years, but little has changed on the ground. The petition was filed by Bombay Environment Action Group (BEAG) for the removal of huts and a halt to quarrying in forest land. Although the final order […]]]>

This Saturday, the Bombay High Court’s order to clear Sanjay Gandhi’s national park of encroachment will run out for 25 years, but little has changed on the ground.

The petition was filed by Bombay Environment Action Group (BEAG) for the removal of huts and a halt to quarrying in forest land. Although the final order came much later, in 2003, the state forest department made virtually no progress in removing the encroachment. Huts have multiplied and the latest area to fall victim is Sai Bangoda, near Lake Vihar, where nearly 100 acres of forest land has been encroached.

The SGNP covers 103 km² and stretches from Thane to Borivali on the east-west side, and from Goregaon to Dahisar on the north-south side. These slums are largely on the outskirts of the park.

Environmentalist Debi Goenka, who previously worked for BEAG, told The Indian Express: “The problem was that the demolition was not done in an efficient manner. The perimeter wall was not finished. Many of those who obtained pucca houses in Chandivali sold them and returned to the park’s slums. I think only 10% of slums have disappeared.”

However, Goenka pointed out, taxis and cars have been banned from entering the park and food stalls have also been removed. He also said that quarrying had completely ceased. Now it is planned to have electric vehicles to take visitors from Borivali main gate to Kanheri caves. The Malad side is one of the most affected by slums. In Bhandup West, near the BMC filtration plant, the forest department has built a perimeter wall, but there are hordes of slums inside. When this correspondent visited the scene two weeks ago, two groups of slum dwellers were playing cards inside the wooded area and there were beer bottles lying around. Cases of wandering leopards in housing societies are also common.

Besides the encroachment, there are a few tribal hamlets that need to be moved. When the HC judgment was delivered, the SGNP was headed by an officer with the rank of sub-curator. DCF Anand Bharati had been here for almost 12 years removing the huts but failed to do so as the encroachment continues. Today, the SGNP is headed either by an officer of the rank of chief curator or that of curator. The current field manager is Indian Forest Officer G Mallikarjun and he has two assistant conservators to assist him. The SGNP had also secured many more guards to help with the demolition.

In the early years, the demolition crews faced intense opposition from slum dwellers. They allegedly burned down their homes and blamed the Forestry Department for it or accused forestry staff of assaulting their wives or even threatening cases under the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act 1989.

Along with the order to remove the encroachments, the High Court also issued an order to repossess 100 acres of quarry land in Dahisar, which was done.

Clement Ben, another Senior Chief Conservator of Forests (West) told The Indian Express: “SGNP is a natural forest in a sea of ​​humanity. It is one of a kind in the whole world. More recently, a woodlot in Aarey was transferred to the Forest Department. But the removal of slums has not taken place. In the 1997 ruling, a slum upgrading program was to be implemented. The first phase took place but none of the slum dwellers came forward during the second phase.

Ben said the Forestry Department is building protective huts (areas where forestry personnel can hide) along the border, which will monitor new encroachments.

Former IAS officer Praveen Pardeshi, who was the forestry secretary and later the additional chief secretary of the CM office, said, “I was the forestry secretary 15 days after the judgment. We have completed most of the boundary walls to prevent further encroachment. We have removed the encroachment to some extent. We also had a plan to rehabilitate 2,000 families and this was approved by the government. This is the only way to make SGNP slum-free. I remember a lot of slum dwellers were moved to Chandivali.”

But the retired senior chief forest (wildlife) conservator, Nitin Kakodkar, has a different view. He said: “The juxtaposition of eligible and non-eligible huts caused a problem. Big chunks couldn’t be cleared all at once. This was the main reason for the failure. [Prior to 1995, slums were protected, hence, eligible. The ones after were unprotected. However, later, the government extended the protection to slums constructed till 2000.]”

Environmentalist D Stalin of the NGO Vanshakti has proposed a different solution. He said: “More than 25,000 new barracks have been erected since the judgment. Slums will never disappear. I had suggested that instead of giving away houses, take those areas out of the park and add new areas that aren’t built on. I also sent a list of domains. But the problem got worse. The Forest Department has been ineffective in stopping further encroachments.”

There have been incidents of leopards straying to Gorai village in Borivali West across the creek, and also to the Vikhroli mangroves when crossing the railway line. On many occasions, leopards come to human settlements to kill stray dogs.

NCP leader Vidya Chavan, who led the struggle for slum dwellers, said, “I was in Janata Dal when I championed the cause of slum dwellers. I used to travel by train and I met women whose houses were demolished by the forest department and I took up their cause. Once, I traveled on my bicycle from my home in Vile Parle to the Damu Nagar demolition site. My intention was to save the houses of the poor.”

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South Kingstown gets $18,750 for sewage disposal from boats https://mydogshavefleas.com/south-kingstown-gets-18750-for-sewage-disposal-from-boats/ Fri, 06 May 2022 17:35:43 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/south-kingstown-gets-18750-for-sewage-disposal-from-boats/ SOUTH KINGSTOWN, RI – South Kingstown was one of seven communities and private businesses to receive part of the $75,000 grant awarded by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) to help pump the sewage from ports and other shipping areas. The grants, funded by the US Fish & Wildlife Service Clean Vessel Act […]]]>

SOUTH KINGSTOWN, RI – South Kingstown was one of seven communities and private businesses to receive part of the $75,000 grant awarded by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) to help pump the sewage from ports and other shipping areas.

The grants, funded by the US Fish & Wildlife Service Clean Vessel Act (CVA), will support five projects in Narragansett Bay, a facility at Point Judith Pond and a pump boat on the Pawcatuck River. Each year, DEM seeks federal funds to purchase or replace CVA equipment used by municipal and private marinas to provide low-cost oil changes. Since 1994, DEM has awarded more than $2 million in CVA grants, state officials said.

“Most of us know that it is not fair to dump sewage directly from our boats into Narragansett Bay or the ocean. In fact, it is illegal to pump waste within three nautical miles off the coast of Rhode Island,” said Terry Gray, DEM’s acting director. “DEM works with municipal and maritime business partners to prevent the discharge of sewage from boats, which impairs water quality by introducing bacteria and other pathogens and chemicals harmful to humans and marine life. “

The South Kingstown grant was $18,750 and will be used to replace a stationary pump at Ram Point Marina in Pt. Judith Pond.

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BC SPCA calls for removal of bird feeders https://mydogshavefleas.com/bc-spca-calls-for-removal-of-bird-feeders/ Thu, 05 May 2022 17:24:36 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/bc-spca-calls-for-removal-of-bird-feeders/ The BC SPCA has asked the public to temporarily remove empty bird feeders and baths due to the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the province and country. Bird flu, also known as “bird flu,” is a virus that affects many species of birds, including farmed, wild and pet birds, according to the […]]]>

The BC SPCA has asked the public to temporarily remove empty bird feeders and baths due to the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the province and country.

Bird flu, also known as “bird flu,” is a virus that affects many species of birds, including farmed, wild and pet birds, according to the BC SPCA.

According to the BC SPCA, the H5N1 strain causes severe illness and death in birds, and the virus is spread through the droppings and respiratory secretions of birds, and can survive in the environment for several months and then infect others. birds.

“Bird feeders can be sites for the spread of disease, as they encourage congregations of unnatural birds and attract other wildlife,” says Dr. Andrea Wallace, wildlife welfare manager for the BC SPCA.

“Fallen seeds are also a particularly dangerous source of disease – when birds feed on the ground, they are also exposed to droppings that accumulate under a feeder.”

“On rare occasions, this virus can also cause illness in humans who have had close contact with infected birds or heavily contaminated areas,” Wallace adds.

“We must do everything we can to stop H5N1 in its tracks.”

Wallace would also like to say that hummingbird feeders aren’t as risky as they are species-specific, so a limited group of birds feed there.

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Ypsilanti Town Notifies Residents of Peninsular Paper Dam Removal https://mydogshavefleas.com/ypsilanti-town-notifies-residents-of-peninsular-paper-dam-removal/ Tue, 03 May 2022 15:46:56 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/ypsilanti-town-notifies-residents-of-peninsular-paper-dam-removal/ Ypsilanti officials held a town hall on April 27 to update Ypsilanti residents on their progress in removing the Peninsular Paper Dam across the Huron River. The public town hall held at the Ypsilanti Freighthouse welcomed a crowd of residents divided between those who support the removal of the dam and those who are not […]]]>

Ypsilanti officials held a town hall on April 27 to update Ypsilanti residents on their progress in removing the Peninsular Paper Dam across the Huron River.

The public town hall held at the Ypsilanti Freighthouse welcomed a crowd of residents divided between those who support the removal of the dam and those who are not yet ready to let it go.

The dam, built in 1867 and rebuilt in 1920, once provided power for papermaking for Peninsular Paper Co. In the mid-1980s the dam was donated to the town of Ypsilanti, but it now represents a threat to security and harm to the environment.

A feasibility study was conducted in September 2018 and presented to the City of Ypsilanti. The City Council held a meeting at City Hall in February 2019 to update Ypsilanti residents on the results of the study and get feedback on how to move forward. In the study, they found that the total cost of removing the dam was approximately $2.7 million. Meanwhile, the cost to repair the dam was nearly $807,000.

According to the town of Ypsilanti, “the town is required to pay for inspections and repairs to the dam so that it has less funds to spend on community programs and infrastructure. Additionally, as the dam harms the river and wildlife, the community’s quality of life is compromised.

Overall, removing the dam will benefit native fish species, and officials will have to find new ways to manage invasive species as the area above the dam begins to “green.” Fish such as walleye, white bass and smallmouth bass will continue to benefit.

Officials also discussed how the dam affects residents and businesses of Ypsilanti and how removing the dam would benefit those people. The Huron River Watershed Council, the city’s partner for the removal, also submitted an environmental restoration plan for the area above the dam.

The removal will allow for expansion of Peninsular Park, and the city wants residents’ voices to be heard in the process of downsizing their vision over the next year. This could include preserving the Peninsular Paper Dam building with the infamous neon sign.

For study reports, plans and other resources, visit Huron River Watershed Council website.


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