Flea removal – My Dogs Have Fleas http://mydogshavefleas.com/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 00:54:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mydogshavefleas.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x115.png Flea removal – My Dogs Have Fleas http://mydogshavefleas.com/ 32 32 Critter Stop Provides Insight into Unprecedented Wildlife Removal Services https://mydogshavefleas.com/critter-stop-provides-insight-into-unprecedented-wildlife-removal-services/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 08:43:57 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/critter-stop-provides-insight-into-unprecedented-wildlife-removal-services/ Critter Stop, a wildlife removal company, explained why they offer exceptional animal removal services, setting themselves apart from other companies. The company said that using attractive cosmetic materials helps provide the best solutions for homeowners. With their lifetime warranty, the company offers durable solutions, making them the best pet removal company in the Dallas-Fort Worth […]]]>

Critter Stop, a wildlife removal company, explained why they offer exceptional animal removal services, setting themselves apart from other companies. The company said that using attractive cosmetic materials helps provide the best solutions for homeowners. With their lifetime warranty, the company offers durable solutions, making them the best pet removal company in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.

Southlake, Texas – Critter Stop says critters can often still enter a home even after moving services have relocated the trapped animals. When Critter Stop seals their customers’ homes, the company provides a lifetime warranty. With this warranty, customers are covered should an animal ever come into their home – as long as the customer maintains their warranty, Critter Stop will come back and fix the problem for free.

The company outlined the reasons for providing the best service in North Texas. The first reason is that it provides comprehensive and high quality services. The team lets the lifetime warranty and their savvy reviews speak for themselves.

The team also mentioned that they offer same-day planning and free estimates, whether it’s removing Southlake squirrels or removing Southlake rats, Critter Stop will fix their customers’ issues the fastest. possible. The company said response time is a high priority and it is treating all animal invasions as emergencies. The company wants to make sure it never keeps its customers waiting.

The company stressed that when relocating animals, it is careful not to harm them. This is especially important when removing raccoons in Southlake and other larger animals such as possums. The team said they are returning the animals to their natural environment to continue living. However, he confirmed he was using lethal methods when controlling rats in Southlake, as the animals are smaller and live trapping is often not possible. The company also mentioned that it deeply disinfects customer properties to kill germs and microbacteria left behind by animals while preventing animal invasions in the future.

About Critter Stop

Critter Stop is a premier wildlife removal company that provides home protection in Southlake, Texas. The company offers a variety of services, including humane wildlife removal and isolation services. Besides protecting the home, the company also provides energy efficiency in homes to help homeowners pay lower monthly energy bills. It offers free inspection and charges an affordable fee for the entire animal disposal project. The company also has a critter library that showcases the common animals that invade many homes.

Media contact
Company Name: Bug stop
Contact: Chisam Reiter
E-mail: Send an email
Telephone: (214) 561-2744
Address:1610 Hart Street, 102 Street
City: Southlake
State: Emission
Country: United States
Website: http://www.critterstop.com/


Source link

]]>
Awakening the Roots: Mahkota Dewa Is Medicinal, Pandan Plant Care, Snail Removal & More, Home & Design News & Top Stories https://mydogshavefleas.com/awakening-the-roots-mahkota-dewa-is-medicinal-pandan-plant-care-snail-removal-more-home-design-news-top-stories/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/awakening-the-roots-mahkota-dewa-is-medicinal-pandan-plant-care-snail-removal-more-home-design-news-top-stories/ Mahkota Dewa valued as a medicinal plant This plant was given to me by a Chinese doctor a few years ago. Now he is bearing fruit. What is its name and what can it be used for? Tar by Phua Cheng The shrub depicted is botanically known as Phaleria macrocarpa. Its common names include Mahkota […]]]>

Mahkota Dewa valued as a medicinal plant

This plant was given to me by a Chinese doctor a few years ago. Now he is bearing fruit. What is its name and what can it be used for?

Tar by Phua Cheng

The shrub depicted is botanically known as Phaleria macrocarpa. Its common names include Mahkota Dewa and the Crown of God. It can grow as a shrub or small tree and thrives in filtered sunlight outdoors. It also produces fragrant white flowers.

The bright red fruit is poisonous and should not be eaten without prior treatment and monitoring. The leaves, branches, fruits and seeds of the plant are used in traditional medicine and are often cultivated for this purpose.


The shrub is a basil plant with aromatic leaves

What is this plant ? I grew it from a packet of holy basil seeds and it doesn’t look like the photo on the packaging. It also has a citrus scent.

Carol Teo

PHOTO: CAROL TEO

Your photo shows a basil plant (Ocimum basilicum) which is a separate species from holy basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum).

The Sweet Basil series has several notable cultivars. A few of them are known to have leaves with a citrus scent, such as lemon and lime basil. Your plant could be one of them. Buy seeds from reputable suppliers for more reliable products and for reliable germination rates.


Awl snails can be removed with watermelon bait

My potted plants were infested with tiny snails. Where do they come from and how do I get rid of them?

Tan Tock Beng


PHOTO: TAN TOCK BENG

The snails shown are probably punch snails, which may not be attracted to commercially available snail pellets. Use watermelon skins as a bait, placing them on the ground so that the white part of the skin is facing down. You can then remove the snails attracted to the skins.

To manage the problem, removing or cleaning up potential snail hiding places is essential. In a garden, these are usually damp, shady spaces such as leaf debris and flower pots.


The plant is the flower of the crown

Where can I find Erukkan leafy plant in Singapore? It has medicinal value and is considered a natural remedy for heel pain in Sri Lanka. Also, where can I buy spice plants from the National Parks Office?

Shirley sivakumaran


PHOTO: SHIRLEY SIVAKUMARAN

The plant you are interested in is the crown flower and its botanical name is Calotropis gigantea. It grows like a lanky shrub with leaves that feed the caterpillars of the Plains Tiger and Common Crow butterflies. As such, this plant is likely to be more sought after by eco gardeners who plant a butterfly garden. Note that damaged parts of the plant produce toxic milky sap.

The Crown Flower plant is available for sale at some large commercial nurseries. NParks sells a selection of different plants each quarter at Rake Spade in HortPark.


Keep the pandan plant evenly moist, avoid letting it dry out

Why are the tips of the leaves of my pandanus – even the youngest ones – turning brown?

Jennifer teo


PHOTO: JENNIFER TEO

The Pandan plant (Pandanus amaryllifolius) grows best in well-drained soil that is kept moist at all times. Potted specimens often dry out if they are not watered regularly, which can cause plants to wilt and parts of the leaves to dry out.

From the photo, your plant appears to have been infested with spider mites, giving the leaves the spotted appearance. You can use a diluted soap solution to spray and wash the pests from your plant regularly to control the infestation. Summer oil, an environmentally friendly garden pesticide, can also be used.

  • Answers from Dr. Wilson Wong, NParks Certified Practicing Horticulturist, Park Manager and ISA Certified Arborist. He is the founder of Green Culture Singapore and Assistant Assistant Professor (Food Science and Technology) at the National University of Singapore.
  • Do you have a question about gardening? Email it with clear, high-resolution images of at least 1MB, if applicable, and your full name to stlife@sph.com.sg. We reserve the right to modify and reject the questions.


Source link

]]>
Weir removal project wins two environmental awards https://mydogshavefleas.com/weir-removal-project-wins-two-environmental-awards/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 22:22:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/weir-removal-project-wins-two-environmental-awards/ A project that opened up a South Taranaki river to native fish after 120 years has won two awards. Te Korowai o Ngāruahine Trust led the charge to remove the disused 3m high spillway from Kaūpokonui Creek near Glenn Rd, about 5 km off the south coast of Taranaki. It was finally retired in February […]]]>

A project that opened up a South Taranaki river to native fish after 120 years has won two awards.

Te Korowai o Ngāruahine Trust led the charge to remove the disused 3m high spillway from Kaūpokonui Creek near Glenn Rd, about 5 km off the south coast of Taranaki.

It was finally retired in February after many years of work.

Bart Jansma, environmental policy advisor for the Te Korowai O Ngaruahine Trust, worked for at least 15 years to see the Glenn Rd spillway on the Kaupokonui Stream dismantled.

Catherine Groenestein / Tips

Bart Jansma, environmental policy advisor for the Te Korowai O Ngaruahine Trust, worked for at least 15 years to see the Glenn Rd spillway on the Kaupokonui Stream dismantled.

The project was announced last week as the second place winner in the “River Story” category of the Cawthron New Zealand River Awards.

And the iwi trust also won an environmental award from the Taranaki regional council for environmental action in the community, for the project.

READ MORE:
* The award recognizes a precedent for the restoration of the Taranaki River
* Taranaki environmental champions honored with annual awards
* The old Taranaki spillway was finally removed after 20 years of battle

The structure had restricted fish passage to about 85% of the stream, as well as the entire Dunns and Little Dunns Creek watershed and many unnamed tributaries, resulting in a significant reduction in abundance and richness of fish, Bart Jansma, environmental politician said Te Korowai O Ngaruahine Trust advisor.

Funding of $ 25,000 to remove the spillway was provided by the trust, STDC, Fish and Game Taranaki, Fonterra and TRC.

Up to fifteen native fish species can now navigate freely upstream, said Paddy Deegan, TRC freshwater scientist.

The dam, finally removed in February, had closed the river to native fish for 120 years.

Catherine Groenestein / Tips

The dam, finally removed in February, had closed the river to native fish for 120 years.

“The spillway was preventing access to a significant amount of habitat for many of these species, some of which are threatened or threatened with population decline.

“Even one of our sportiest fish, the lamprey (piharau), struggled to navigate the dam, which unfortunately resulted in the deaths of over 100 adults in 2020.”


Source link

]]>
Council renounces logging in Congo https://mydogshavefleas.com/council-renounces-logging-in-congo/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 04:04:52 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/council-renounces-logging-in-congo/ FEEDBACK :On September 8, 2021, the High Court ruled that the media are legally responsible for defamatory comments made by the public on posts published on an organization’s Facebook pages. The move has ramifications for all media organizations that operate social media pages or have commenting features on their websites. If the default setting to […]]]>

FEEDBACK :
On September 8, 2021, the High Court ruled that the media are legally responsible for defamatory comments made by the public on posts published on an organization’s Facebook pages. The move has ramifications for all media organizations that operate social media pages or have commenting features on their websites. If the default setting to allow comments on a post is not changed, it is considered an invitation or encouragement to comment. If someone posts a defamatory comment, the media organization that owns the page is legally considered a “publisher” of the comments and can be sued.

Due to the risks associated with comments from unidentified contributors that expose The Beagle to possible legal action under the NSW Defamation Act 2005 No 77, the anonymous or Nom de Plume comments should not be available – but try as I can is like raising cats to attract people to conform. Ultimately, it’s up to the moderator to either allow it as written or make changes to make it acceptable. If I don’t know you your comment WILL NOT BE PUBLISHED

NOTE to those who wish to comment: Why don’t you tell us your name. Make a comment and own it. Have a conversation, but let the other person know who you are. If you are hiding behind a pseudonym, it might be because you work for the Council, live in a small witty town that will ask for your opinion, or just enjoy the humor of fancy naming yourself. .

PS. Do not hesitate to Send us an email through our normal or encrypted email accounts.

Please note that if you are looking for a previous comment that is no longer visible, please contact us.


Source link

]]>
Free Articles Limit Reached – The Waterways Journal https://mydogshavefleas.com/free-articles-limit-reached-the-waterways-journal/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 14:29:30 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/free-articles-limit-reached-the-waterways-journal/ Thank you for visiting the Waterways Journal website. We hope you enjoyed your three free articles this week. As you may already know, we now charge for unlimited access to our content. You can come back next week and access three more free articles or choose unlimited access with a digital subscription and continue to […]]]>

Thank you for visiting the Waterways Journal website.

We hope you enjoyed your three free articles this week.

As you may already know, we now charge for unlimited access to our content. You can come back next week and access three more free articles or choose unlimited access with a digital subscription and continue to stay on top of inland navigation news anytime, anywhere and on any device. Subscription is quick and easy.

To continue reading, sign up now or log in.


Subscribe online now

All access to print and digital editions of the Waterways Journal for only $ 45 per year. Your printed subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

All access to print and digital editions of the Waterways Journal for two years for $ 80. Your printed subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

All access to print and digital editions of the Waterways Journal for three years for $ 115. Your printed subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

If you are currently a WJ print subscriber, you now have free access to the website. Simply select this option and we will verify your information and activate your account within 24-72 hours. You will receive a confirmation when your access has been approved.



Source link

]]>
The elimination of several thousand wild pines is beneficial for the environment and physical condition https://mydogshavefleas.com/the-elimination-of-several-thousand-wild-pines-is-beneficial-for-the-environment-and-physical-condition/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 18:14:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/the-elimination-of-several-thousand-wild-pines-is-beneficial-for-the-environment-and-physical-condition/ From left to right, Cruze Williams, David Ngawaka, Lily Neilson and Max Lowe collectively uprooted and hand-sawn over 34,000 wild pines from the Black Jack reserve, Kuaotunu. Photo / Supplied Over 34,000 wild pines have been removed from the Black Jack Reserve in Kuaotunu, on the Coromandel Peninsula. This monitoring work is one of nine […]]]>

From left to right, Cruze Williams, David Ngawaka, Lily Neilson and Max Lowe collectively uprooted and hand-sawn over 34,000 wild pines from the Black Jack reserve, Kuaotunu. Photo / Supplied

Over 34,000 wild pines have been removed from the Black Jack Reserve in Kuaotunu, on the Coromandel Peninsula.

This monitoring work is one of nine community-based wild pine projects in Waikato to receive funding from the government’s Jobs for Nature program.

Kristina Pickford, administrator of Kuaotunu Peninsula Trust, says the number of wild pines removed from the 83-hectare site is a testament to the threat they pose to the environment.

Kuaotunu Peninsula Trust has successfully applied for Community Partnership Project funding of $ 375,000 from the National Wild Conifer Control Program for the project which is administratively and operationally led by the Waikato Regional Council.

The funding is intended for work not only in the Black Jack reserve, but also for the control of wild pine in the Matarangi Bluff reserve and on tracts of land between WhauWhau beach and Opito bay.

“I see pine trees as a massive threat to biodiversity,” says Kristina. “They are everywhere you go, covering New Zealand. The Coromandel is blessed with lots of native bushes, but take the time to look at the land, which is worrying is the extent of the wild pine infestations. “

Wild pines are a fast-spreading noxious plant that, if left unchecked, will invade more than a quarter of New Zealand within 30 years.

Kristina and her husband bought land in Otama about five years ago, after moving from Christchurch. She is therefore aware of the wild pine problem in the South Island and is determined to solve the problem in the Kuaotunu peninsula.

“I saw that a good job had been done in the area and learned that a few landowners were personally funding the control of wild pine in the Black Jack reserve since 2010. We got together and formed a charitable trust. which has a range of environmental objectives, including the control of wild pines.

For this project, the trust worked with Rings Beach Wetland Group, Opito Bay Ratepayers Association and Project Kiwi Trust.

Subscribe to Premium

“There are a lot of important, established and regenerating coastal forests that we are trying to keep the pines out of.”

Wild pines are a threat to biodiversity and the primary sector as they can invade iconic landscapes, unique natural habitats and productive lands.

“They also represent a fire hazard,” explains Kristina. “The fires at Port Hill, just outside of Christchurch, demonstrated this too clearly. Every pine tree is like a bomb with the amount of fuel and energy it has. We have to keep them out.”

The majority of the large wilderness areas of the Black Jack Reserve had already been cleared, and funding from the National Wild Conifer Control Program contributed significantly to regrowth which posed a threat to any gains made.

A young local crew pulled and sawed by hand tens of thousands of young wild pines in the Black Jack Preserve and are now working in the Matarangi Bluff Preserve.

Larger pine trees are shot or poisoned from a helicopter, by specialist contractors, depending on what can be done safely.

Entrepreneur Travis Boyd says this has been a great opportunity for his team. They learned various new skills and qualifications – for example, certification for GrowSafe, operating a chainsaw and felling trees – which will open up employment opportunities for them in the future.

“It was pretty impressive to watch. They crashed into the bush, tearing and chopping off the smaller pines. They’ve gained confidence and muscle; they’re a lot fitter than when we started.

“It’s tough ground and very hard work, but they thrived – I’m proud of them.”

In 2020, the government allocated $ 100 million in funding over four years to expand the national wild conifer control program. This funding is managed by Biosecurity New Zealand, which is a business management unit of the Ministry of Primary Industries.

To date, approximately $ 1.3 million has been spent on nine community projects in Coromandel and Taupō.

To learn more about community projects, visit waikatoregion.govt.nz/wilding-pines.


Source link

]]>
Abduction of Spit an act of reconciliation, supporters say https://mydogshavefleas.com/abduction-of-spit-an-act-of-reconciliation-supporters-say-2/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 01:42:00 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/abduction-of-spit-an-act-of-reconciliation-supporters-say-2/ A member of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw told the crowd at a briefing that the government has a duty to remove the structure, which has hurt the numbers of salmon. Despite the proliferation of fierce criticism on social media and elsewhere against the dismantling of the Squamish Spit, no one voiced opposition during a recent Restore the […]]]>

A member of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw told the crowd at a briefing that the government has a duty to remove the structure, which has hurt the numbers of salmon.

Despite the proliferation of fierce criticism on social media and elsewhere against the dismantling of the Squamish Spit, no one voiced opposition during a recent Restore the Shore (CERP) briefing on the subject.

On November 17, dozens of people filled the Brackendale Art Gallery to hear about plans to remove hundreds of yards of the man-made berm south of the Yellow Gate. It was a presentation sometimes punctuated by applause.

The Restore the Shore project, formerly known as the Central Estuary Restoration Project, or CERP, aims to remove part of the spit so that young juvenile salmon have access to the estuary. Since the berm was built in the 1970s to service the industry, it has resulted in a sharp decline in chinook numbers. The structure forces premature salmon out into Howe Sound before they are strong enough to survive in ocean waters.

Randall Lewis, the founder of the Squamish River Watershed Society, presented the removal of the structure as a necessary act of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

He told the assembled crowd that in the 1990s, when he was on the Nexwsxwníw̓ ntm ta Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation Council), he urged the provincial government to do away with the structure.

“We knew this was having an impact on our species of salmon, chinook in particular,” he said.

(Chief Squamish has contacted the provincial government about this, but did not receive a response until the press deadline.)

The current removal project is a partnership between the Squamish River Watershed Society, the Squamish Nation and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

It is funded by the Coastal Restoration Fund, the Pacific Salmon Foundation, the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund, and the Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program.

Squamish River Watershed Executive Director Edith Tobe told the meeting that the project team has conducted studies on the impact of the berm removal on the Squamish terminals.

There are concerns that the removal of the boom will result in the deposition of silt and sediment near the port, creating problems for ships in the area.

However, Tobe said studies so far appear to show that the boom does little to act as a shield against river debris and sedimentation, but it significantly impairs the ability of salmon to cross the estuary.

Squamish River Watershed Society President Chessy Knight said when the spire was first built there was little to no study to see its effects in the area.

However, in the process of the withdrawal, Knight said the company spent around $ 200,000 to study the effects of the withdrawal.

“It’s so ironic for me,” she said.

Tobe said the project has been in the works for decades.

“This project is being carried out, as part of reconciliation with the Squamish Nation, and they have said very loudly and very clearly that they are not backing down,” she said. “It’s an important project.”


Source link

]]>
Abduction of Spit an act of reconciliation, supporters say https://mydogshavefleas.com/abduction-of-spit-an-act-of-reconciliation-supporters-say/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 01:41:15 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/abduction-of-spit-an-act-of-reconciliation-supporters-say/ A member of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw told the crowd at a briefing that the government has a duty to remove the structure, which has hurt the numbers of salmon. Despite the proliferation of fierce criticism on social media and elsewhere against the dismantling of the Squamish Spit, no one voiced opposition during a recent Restore the […]]]>

A member of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw told the crowd at a briefing that the government has a duty to remove the structure, which has hurt the numbers of salmon.

Despite the proliferation of fierce criticism on social media and elsewhere against the dismantling of the Squamish Spit, no one voiced opposition during a recent Restore the Shore (CERP) briefing on the subject.

On November 17, dozens of people filled the Brackendale Art Gallery to hear about plans to remove hundreds of yards of the man-made berm south of the Yellow Gate. It was a presentation sometimes punctuated by applause.

The Restore the Shore project, formerly known as the Central Estuary Restoration Project, or CERP, aims to remove part of the spit so that young juvenile salmon have access to the estuary. Since the berm was built in the 1970s to service the industry, it has resulted in a sharp decline in chinook numbers. The structure forces premature salmon out into Howe Sound before they are strong enough to survive in ocean waters.

Randall Lewis, the founder of the Squamish River Watershed Society, presented the removal of the structure as a necessary act of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

He told the assembled crowd that in the 1990s, when he was on the Nexwsxwníw̓ ntm ta Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation Council), he urged the provincial government to do away with the structure.

“We knew this was having an impact on our species of salmon, chinook in particular,” he said.

(Chief Squamish has contacted the provincial government about this, but did not receive a response until the press deadline.)

The current removal project is a partnership between the Squamish River Watershed Society, the Squamish Nation and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

It is funded by the Coastal Restoration Fund, the Pacific Salmon Foundation, the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund, and the Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program.

Squamish River Watershed Executive Director Edith Tobe told the meeting that the project team has conducted studies on the impact of the berm removal on the Squamish terminals.

There are concerns that the removal of the boom will result in the deposition of silt and sediment near the port, creating problems for ships in the area.

However, Tobe said studies so far appear to show that the boom does little to act as a shield against river debris and sedimentation, but it significantly impairs the ability of salmon to cross the estuary.

Squamish River Watershed Society President Chessy Knight said when the spire was first built there was little to no study to see its effects in the area.

However, in the process of the withdrawal, Knight said the company spent around $ 200,000 to study the effects of the withdrawal.

“It’s so ironic for me,” she said.

Tobe said the project has been in the works for decades.

“This project is being carried out, as part of reconciliation with the Squamish Nation, and they have said very loudly and very clearly that they are not backing down,” she said. “It’s an important project.”


Source link

]]>
Removal of four PacifiCorp dams on the Klamath River expected to start in early 2023 https://mydogshavefleas.com/removal-of-four-pacificorp-dams-on-the-klamath-river-expected-to-start-in-early-2023/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 11:00:06 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/removal-of-four-pacificorp-dams-on-the-klamath-river-expected-to-start-in-early-2023/ If all goes according to plan, the removal of four PacifiCorp dams on the Klamath River that have blocked the migration of salmon and rainbow trout for more than 100 years will begin in early 2023, according to the executive director of the Klamath River. Renewal Corporation (KRRC), Mark Bransom. By Dan Bacher Branson spoke […]]]>

If all goes according to plan, the removal of four PacifiCorp dams on the Klamath River that have blocked the migration of salmon and rainbow trout for more than 100 years will begin in early 2023, according to the executive director of the Klamath River. Renewal Corporation (KRRC), Mark Bransom.

By Dan Bacher

Branson spoke at a press briefing Friday also attended by Amy Cordallis, Yurok Tribe Lawyer, Brian Johnson, Director of Trout Unlimited CA, Craig Tucker, Karuk Tribe Natural Resource Policy Consultant, Kelly Delpit, Responsible for the Sustainable Northwest Klamath Basin and the Director of PCFFA Northwest, Glen Spain. Tucker moderated the event.

KRRC’s job is to take ownership of four PacifiCorp dams – JC Boyle, Copco No.1 and No.2, and Iron Gate – then remove those dams, restore the once flooded land, and implement the measures. mitigation required in accordance with all applicable federal laws, state and local regulations. PacifiCorp will continue to operate the dams in the interim, according to reconnectklamath.org.

Removing the dams will open more than 400 miles of the river and tributaries to spawning and farming chinook, coho and rainbow trout – and improve water quality and conditions temperature of the river.

“We are on the cusp of a number of important and significant additional steps that will ultimately lead, in our view, to the removal of the dam,” Bransom said. “Conditions in the basin have been extraordinarily difficult, but we plan to put significant effort into lowering the reservoirs by 2023. By the end of spring 2023 at the latest, construction will begin 6-7 months to complete. position for the removal of dams. The company is doing everything to complete the process.

Implementing the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA) under which the dams are removed has been a “long and bureaucratically complex process,” according to Craig Tucker. Recently, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) filed a “Notice of Preparation for Environmental Review” for the project.

This review process is now underway, with FERC’s draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR), as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), due for release by February 2023.

Trout Unlimited CA Director Brian Johnson, who was a key negotiator in the settlement talks, said the process of removing the dam “opens up a lot of possibilities in the basin.”

He made several remarks to correct some myths about the process of removing the dam:

• Dams are not used for irrigation or municipal water supply.

• The Klamath River will not dry up in the summer, as there is already a water reservoir in Upper Klamath Lake. Dams are only used for hydropower – not for irrigation or water storage like other reservoirs.

• Since the dams were not designed to control flooding, there will be no significant loss of flood safety for residents living along the river. “The current dams would be full long before they could help control downstream flooding,” he said.

• The sediments behind the dams are not toxic and have been extensively sampled.

He stressed that there would be “short-term impacts during construction,” but based on other dam removal projects in the country, he predicted the sediment would clear quickly.

Finally, he noted that some conspiracy theories were circulating, claiming that the salmon had never passed the four PacifiCorp dams – that there were lava flows blocking the passage of the fish.

He replied that the lava flows filled the river with water – several hundred thousand years ago – but that natural erosion destroyed these barriers several tens of thousands of years ago. He also said there had been carbon dating of salmon bones on the river in tribal fish camps high above dams that confirm migration of salmon and rainbow trout in the Klamath and the tributaries above the dams thousands of years before they were built just over 100 years. since.

Kelly Delpit, a Klamath Basin farmer who represents Sustainable Northwest, also pointed out that PacifiCorp’s four reservoirs do not provide water for irrigation.

“In short, what’s good for fish is good for farms. Removing the dams will benefit fish, people and agriculture. The removal of the dam is a big step towards restoring the balance of the Klamath basin, ”she said.

Amy Cordalis, a lawyer from the Yurok tribe, who introduced herself in the Yurok language, said she came from a traditional fishing family in the village of Requa at the mouth of the Klamath River.

She stressed the urgency of removing the dam at this time. “The Klamath River was once the third largest producer of salmon in the continental United States, but now it only accounts for 1 to 3 percent of historical runs,” Cordalis said. “The removal and restoration of dams is vital for the entire river. When we talk about the health of the river, we are talking about the health of the entire ecosystem. At the same time, we have experienced a historic drought that puts additional pressure on the river. “

“During this drought, 80 to 90 percent of baby salmon have been killed in the past 4 years by the C. Shasta parasitic in bad river conditions caused by dams, ”she said. “There are also blooms of blue-green algae in the summer where people cannot enter the water because it is harmful to their health.”

“The Klamath River has been operated at minimal flows for the past 1 1/2 years. It’s like keeping the river on life support. We cannot continue to operate this way, ”she said.

“I want to get the river back from my great-grandmother,” Cordalis said. “She was born before the dams. She and other ancestors had a clean, healthy river that supported themselves and their families. This is how the Yurok people have existed since the dawn of time.

She noted that the Yurok have benefited from the resources of the Klamath River for thousands of years.

“At Yurok, we don’t use the term sustainable but balanced,” she added. “We are now in this location because the river is very out of balance due to colonization, but we are working with allies and partners to restore balance to the river. The removal of the dam is essential; it can’t come soon enough. We are calling for the dam to be removed in 2023. “

Glen Spain, Northwestern Regional Director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA), highlighted how the continued management of the Klamath under the management of weaker stocks is wreaking havoc on commercial fishing families and recreation areas from Oregon and Washington to Monterey.

“When the salmon leave the Klamath River, they head north and south,” he said. “The Monterey salmon fishery on the Oregon-Washington border is now managed by managing the weakest stocks. There are not enough Klamath fish in the ocean and the fish are now suffering from a glove of disease as they move down the river. What happens in dams and rivers affects people hundreds of kilometers along the coast. “

“We (the commercial fishermen) are the same people as the farmers – the food providers – and we have a lot in common,” he said.

In response to my question on how Iron Gate Hatchery operations will be affected by the dam removal process, Mark Branson said they will make sure to implement a transition plan from the dam. hatchery before the lakes are drawn before the removal of the dam.

Under the KHSA, there will be temporary hatchery facilities at the Fall Creek Hatchery and elsewhere. To meet fish mitigation goals, PacifiCorp has already agreed to pay for fish hatchery operations at Fall Creek, which is state-owned by the state of California, for up to 8 years after the dam is removed.

Spain stressed that there will be sediment runoff on the river for a few years after the removal of the four dams. But he noted that hydrologists estimate that the fine sediment released by the removal of the dam would flow into the sea within one or two winters, through the normal process of erosion.

“We also expect the dam removal to take place during the wettest part of the season in February and January. Fish are usually not around this time of year. We are doing everything to mitigate the impacts on the fish… fish biologists predict that the fish will recolonize the river when the dams are removed, ”Spain said.

Cordalis added that the Yurok tribe is the biggest salmon fisherman in the Klamath River today.

“The tribe operates a commercial fishery, as well as ritual and subsistence fishing. The tribe has the second highest number of fisheries biologists (next to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife) in the state, ”she said.

“We manage our fishery in terms of restoration and our own harvest with the goal of restoring wild salmon runs. We have evolved with them over a long period. We often joke that fish have our DNA and we have their DNA, ”Cordalis concluded.

The Klamath River dam removal project is the largest of its kind in the country. When complete, salmon and rainbow trout will once again be able to spawn in the headwaters of the Klamath where they spawned for thousands of years before the dams were built and fish, tribes and farmers. , commercial fishermen, recreational fishermen and communities up and down the Klamath Basin will all benefit, supporters of the dam removal say.

Visit reconnectklamath.org to learn more about the process. You can also find the latest information on dam removal on the KRRC website at www.klamathrestoration.org.


Source link

]]>
Earlham researchers expect little contamination from Weir Dam removal https://mydogshavefleas.com/earlham-researchers-expect-little-contamination-from-weir-dam-removal/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 15:14:25 +0000 https://mydogshavefleas.com/earlham-researchers-expect-little-contamination-from-weir-dam-removal/ RICHMOND, Ind. – Researchers at Earlham College were surprised by their analysis of the sediment behind the Weir Dam. Their study found that removing the dam is not expected to release significant contamination into the Whitewater River, according to a press release. The City of Richmond plans to remove the dam for safety reasons and […]]]>

RICHMOND, Ind. – Researchers at Earlham College were surprised by their analysis of the sediment behind the Weir Dam.

Their study found that removing the dam is not expected to release significant contamination into the Whitewater River, according to a press release. The City of Richmond plans to remove the dam for safety reasons and to improve recreational opportunities for citizens. He received grants from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to remove the dam.

“The sediment accumulated behind the dam is a testament to the industrial history of the Whitewater Gorge,” said Andy Moore, professor of earth and environmental sciences at Earlham. “Although we cannot guarantee the absence of contamination, the measured concentrations were much lower than we had expected. “

STAY INFORMED AND SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM: Subscribe today using the link at the top of this page.


Source link

]]>